Chaos Industries

from chaos comes order

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Just a little riff I’ve been working on; not actually me playing, it was recorded in guitar pro….©hoosiermichael2011

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allcreatures:

Adventurer Mark Moffett has found the world’s biggest insect - which is  so huge it can eat carrots. The former park ranger discovered the giant  weta up a tree and his real life Bugs Bunny has now been declared the  largest ever found. He came across the cricket-like creature, which has a  wing span of seven inches, after two days of searching on a tiny  island. The creepy crawly is only found on Little Barrier Island, in New  Zealand. The species was wiped off the mainland by rats accidentally  introduced by Europeans.

allcreatures:

Adventurer Mark Moffett has found the world’s biggest insect - which is so huge it can eat carrots. The former park ranger discovered the giant weta up a tree and his real life Bugs Bunny has now been declared the largest ever found. He came across the cricket-like creature, which has a wing span of seven inches, after two days of searching on a tiny island. The creepy crawly is only found on Little Barrier Island, in New Zealand. The species was wiped off the mainland by rats accidentally introduced by Europeans.

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mabelmoments:

Toxoplasma gondii requires the cat digestive system for reproduction, so it hitches a ride in a rat (photo: flickr user cobalt123)
The Parasite That Makes a Rat Love a Cat

The life cycle of the parasite Toxoplasma gondii goes like this: Toxoplasma reproduces inside the intestine of a cat, which sheds the parasite in  its feces. Rats then ingest the parasite when they consume food or water  contaminated with cat feces. The parasite takes up residence in the  rat’s brain and, once the rat gets eaten by a cat, it starts the cycle  all over again.
Researchers have known for a few years that a rat infected with Toxoplasma loses its natural response to cat urine and no longer fears the smell.  And they know that the parasite settles in the rat’s amygdala, the part  of the brain that processes fear and emotions. Now a new study in the  journal PLoS ONE adds another bizarre piece to the tale: When male rats infected with Toxoplasma smell cat urine, they have altered activity in the fear part of the  brain as well as increased activity in the part of the brain that is  responsible for sexual behavior and normally activates after exposure to  a female rat.
The double messages of “you smell a cat but he’s not dangerous” and  “that cat is a potential mate” lure the rat into the kitty’s deadly  territory, just what the parasite needs to reproduce. Scientists still  don’t know how the parasite works to alter the brain, though there  apparently is a link to production of dopamine, an important  neurotransmitter in the systems for decision-making and reward.


That is interesting as hell!!!

mabelmoments:

Toxoplasma gondii requires the cat digestive system for reproduction, so it hitches a ride in a rat (photo: flickr user cobalt123)

The Parasite That Makes a Rat Love a Cat

The life cycle of the parasite Toxoplasma gondii goes like this: Toxoplasma reproduces inside the intestine of a cat, which sheds the parasite in its feces. Rats then ingest the parasite when they consume food or water contaminated with cat feces. The parasite takes up residence in the rat’s brain and, once the rat gets eaten by a cat, it starts the cycle all over again.

Researchers have known for a few years that a rat infected with Toxoplasma loses its natural response to cat urine and no longer fears the smell. And they know that the parasite settles in the rat’s amygdala, the part of the brain that processes fear and emotions. Now a new study in the journal PLoS ONE adds another bizarre piece to the tale: When male rats infected with Toxoplasma smell cat urine, they have altered activity in the fear part of the brain as well as increased activity in the part of the brain that is responsible for sexual behavior and normally activates after exposure to a female rat.

The double messages of “you smell a cat but he’s not dangerous” and “that cat is a potential mate” lure the rat into the kitty’s deadly territory, just what the parasite needs to reproduce. Scientists still don’t know how the parasite works to alter the brain, though there apparently is a link to production of dopamine, an important neurotransmitter in the systems for decision-making and reward.

That is interesting as hell!!!

(via allcreatures)

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allcreatures:

A 370lb Golden Bengal Tiger bows its head and placed a paw up to the hand of a small girl. Photographer Dyrk Daniels says: “I noticed this little girl was leaning against the glass with both hands out stretched staring at the ‘big kitties’. I could not believe my eyes when Taj approached the girl, bowed his head and then placed his huge right paw exactly in front of where the little girl’s left hand was. It was incredible to watch. Taj let down his right paw, rubbed his cheek against the glass where the little girl’s face was and moved off.” Far from being scared, the little girl was so excited that she started clapping as she walked back towards her mother.
Picture: Dyrk Daniels/ Solent News & Photo Agency (via Pictures of the day: 31 October 2011 - Telegraph)

allcreatures:

A 370lb Golden Bengal Tiger bows its head and placed a paw up to the hand of a small girl. Photographer Dyrk Daniels says: “I noticed this little girl was leaning against the glass with both hands out stretched staring at the ‘big kitties’. I could not believe my eyes when Taj approached the girl, bowed his head and then placed his huge right paw exactly in front of where the little girl’s left hand was. It was incredible to watch. Taj let down his right paw, rubbed his cheek against the glass where the little girl’s face was and moved off.” Far from being scared, the little girl was so excited that she started clapping as she walked back towards her mother.

Picture: Dyrk Daniels/ Solent News & Photo Agency (via Pictures of the day: 31 October 2011 - Telegraph)

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The very existence of flamethrowers proves that sometime, somewhere, someone said to themselves, “You know, I want to set those people over there on fire, but I’m just not close enough to get the job done.”
George Carlin

(Source: blogzarro.com)